"We have introduced areas of exploration and guidelines separately for different streams like
Design, Architecture, Management, Engineering, Law and Policy students"
"We believe ALL your points of view matter! Watch this video for details on the Wipro earthian 2016
College Program! Click here"

Introduction

Welcome to Wipro earthian 2016

The sustainability paradigm is constantly evolving with multiple perspectives, schools of thought and raging debates. To be able to develop a nuanced understanding of sustainability it is vital to embrace a range of ideas and solutions.

As students, you have the advantage to view the reality of today’s urban living conditions both from the lens of an institution and as future decision-makers.

Your point of view and ideas could help share perspectives on these key urban issues.

With each passing year, the earthian program continues to evolve and re-invent itself. As a part of this evolution, the format for this year’s earthian college submission has been changed as well.

We are discontinuing the practice of last year where you were not allowed to submit your entry if your footprinting exercise had not been completed. This year, you have the option of entering your submission even if you have not completed the part of campus foot printing. However, keep in mind that you stand to lose 20% of the scoring if you skip this part"

How to Participate

Part A 80% weightage ( mandatory)

The objective of this exercise is to increase the exposure of real issues within the sustainability paradigm that afflict us today, as well as encourage you to try your hand at devising practical solutions. There are 3 themes for which you need to prepare an analytical paper.

The context is India-centric.

  • The 3 themes provided are Water, Waste, and Mobility.
  • The themes have been introduced to you via areas of exploration which would guide you on how to approach the project. In addition, there are illustrative examples included to help relate to the themes.
  • The format of the project is designed to push the envelope in terms of concepts and your personal understanding

Target Disciplines*: Design, Architecture, Planning, Management, Engineering, Law/ Policy

*While we have streamlined the project guidelines for the above academic disciplines, whatever be your branch of study, through this exercise we invite you to question and explore the nature of the sustainability paradigm.

Word limit for the essay : 2500-5000 words maximum

 

With an increasing population and a fast growing economy the demand for water is increasing. However, issues of distribution, access, pricing and quality, plague our urban water management There are various aspects to be addressed for an effective urban water management system. The problem of water management in the urban context is essentially centered on assessing needs, managing demand, ensuring equitable and quality access.

Click on the ‘+’ to view the following details for this theme
Context in an infographic | Areas of exploration for each discipline | Illustrative example | Key objectives for the essay

Academic Stream

Areas of exploration
  • Mapping the water problem
  • Designing water aware habitats
  • Water for all – What is in it for urban planning and design ?
  • Integrating visual language/ communication
  • Integrating design thinking for water efficiency

Illustrative example for Design/ planning/architecture: Can architects, planners and designers work towards building more water - aware urban habitats centers? Ecological incorporation is making space to include new habitats within our built environment. Designers and planners are increasingly devising ingenious ways of blending habitats with buildings. This includes using a variety of methods like Hydroponics, intelligent landscaping and Biomimicry. For eg. Biomimicry uses a different, yet compatible, strategy to ecological incorporation. Rather than utilizing biological organisms, biomimicry relies on human innovation and technology imitating biological solutions. Experts are researching locally attuned organisms and systems to understand how biomimicry principles might be used to effectively address the challenges of water pollution from stormwater drainage, sewerage and solid waste.

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Ensure availability, equitable provisioning and efficient distribution
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Water distribution losses
  • monitoring water use and quality
  • Ground water management
  • Scaling up rainwater harvesting
  • The importance of equitable and practical pricing
  • Scaling up demand-side efficiency solutions (eg. Efficient fittings like waterless urinals, low-flow taps)
  • Effective management of waste water as resource

Illustrative example for Management/Engineering: Water management and pricing is What is the price of water to the supplier? What are people being charged out there? Where are our institutions headed in the balance between equity-accessibility and cost recovery of piped water? Is there a need for a re-look at water pricing? There are possible good models in existence in South Africa and Germany which can be emulated’, but the ultimate solution lies in changing water infrastructure and management plans simultaneously.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Ensure availability, equitable provisioning and efficient distribution
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Addressing issues of equity and access
  • Legal ramifications of water as a commons resource
  • Legislative interventions

Illustrative example for Law/Policy: Fresh water, whether supplied or found in water bodies in urban centers, are seen as ‘urban commons’. A commons-based society is one that values and protects commons assets, managing them for the benefit of the common good. However, this is increasingly under threat with the growing encroachment of water resources and thereby uncontrolled depletion and use in many cities. Water commons are rapidly diminishing due to enclosure, disrepair, rezoning, and legal provisions, replaced in many instances by new – privatized, monitored – public spaces, such as malls, plazas, and gated venues. This is a cause for concern because they are critical to economic production in cities, to cultural vibrancy and democracy, to regenerating the sense of place that forms communities and, ultimately, to the reproduction of urban populations and ecosystems. Legal interventions and legislation go a long way in arresting this problem and possibly are one of the only effective methods to ensure that water as an urban commons becomes a reality.

 

 

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Ensure availability, equitable provisioning and efficient distribution
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them

 

With municipal bodies facing severe logistical and financial issues, as well as inadequate public awareness the garbage crisis is nowhere seen to be ending. A feasible economic model of waste management across the value chain, funded by government or generators, is required to sustain the waste management system.

Click on the ‘+’ to view the following details for this theme
Context in an infographic | Areas of exploration for each discipline | Illustrative example | Key objectives for the essay

Academic Stream

Areas of exploration
  • Mapping the waste problem
  • Designing practical waste segregation models
  • Analyzing product life cycles and their implications
  • Integrating visual language/ communication
  • Applying principles of a circular economy to deal with the water problem(life cycles, upcycling etc.)

Illustrative example for Design/ planning/architecture: Principles of the circular economy and the concept of cradle to cradle are slowly gaining acceptance as solutions to part of the waste problem. Eco-designs and intelligent packing can often lead to more resource efficiency, increased lifecycles, better prospects for up-cycling and cleaner alternatives to non- biodegradable and toxic waste. However, they are still problematic streams such as textiles, hygiene products, hazardous waste from households, that need addressing. Design professionals and architects could look at how design thinking can help develop a more restorative industrial and economic system that is personified by low waste production, more efficiency, cleaner components and sustainable product life cycles. sewerage and solid waste.

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Identifying key challenges in solid waste management
  • Integration of formal and informal waste economies
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Financial provisioning for waste management projects
  • Exploration participatory and partnership models
  • Infrastructural support for waste management and disposal platforms
  • Recycling solutions for waste- eg. Reuse, composting, waste to energy

Illustrative example for Management/Engineering: The current mode of municipal waste management in India is centralized in nature. However, this is plagued by numerous problems in the face of the gigantic proportions pf waste being generated. The problems include being large capital and land intensive, high transportation costs and distances, lack of community participation and need for large storage facilities. The decentralized community-based waste management arrangements do not suffer from the above limitations. For example, they treat solid waste near to the origin. In some cases, the treated waste becomes an economic resource, which can be used, thereby eliminating the need for transport, landfill, or treatment at the waste disposal site. They also encourage civic responsibility, and innovation. In India, Bangalore and Pune are good examples where several residential complexes which process organic waste on their premises using technology available with private entrepreneurs. Decentralized arrangements could bring about citizen participation, generate livelihoods, and contribute to environmental sustainability and economic efficiency.

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Identifying key challenges in solid waste management
  • Integration of formal and informal waste economies
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Institutional reforms in municipal and other bodies
  • Environmental and other regulatory compliances
  • Addressing the issues of the informal waste picking economy
  • Legislative interventions

Illustrative example for Law/Policy: The unscientific disposal of waste, which includes the danger from toxic materials as well as unsanitary conditions is a major public health issue in many areas. Since the waste economy is highly unorganized, are there legal interventions and provisions that can unsure that such practices of waste disposal can be deterred? Closely connected to this, is the issue of the massive informal waste economy that is dominated by waste pickers whose livelihood depends on the very same practices. The ideal solution would involve coopting the waste picker community and earning their trust, but at the same time ensuring that there are legal frameworks that safeguard their livelihood and ensures sustenance. Legal interventions can also extend to the widespread involvement vulnerable communities and children in the waste economy. These are all issues that lie at the very heart of the public health debate and need good legal jurisprudence and legislations to make the desired changes.

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Identifying key challenges in solid waste management
  • Integration of formal and informal waste economies
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them

 

Urban India is in a transition, moving from regular cities to sprawling metropolis’s As things stand today, India’s urban strategies have failed to deal with this change. An effective urban mobility strategy will be the key driver behind this transformation, moving people, goods and services and keeping pace with changing social dynamics. Ensuring a more sustainable future requires a transition to an urban mobility strategy that is reliable, efficient, environmentally sound and inclusive.

Click on the ‘+’ to view the following details for this theme
Context in an infographic | Areas of exploration for each discipline | Illustrative example | Key objectives for the essay

Academic Stream

Areas of exploration
  • Applying design thinking to mobility planning
  • Design of multimodal transport hubs in study area
  • Integrating visual language/ communication
  • Effective zonal planning as a crucial element of a good mobility plan

Illustrative example for Design/ planning/architecture: Integrated planning and effective design thinking can go a long way in developing a smart mobility plan. A superb example of such a plan is that of Curutiba. Thirty years ago, Curitiba’s (Brazil) forward-thinking planners integrated public transportation into all the elements of the urban mobility system. The bus system is a model Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system, and plays a large part in making this a livable city. The buses run frequently—some as often as every 90 seconds—and reliably, and the stations are convenient, well-designed, comfortable, and attractive. Consequently, Curitiba has one of the most heavily used, yet low-cost, transit systems in the world.

 

 

 

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Facilitate multi-modal transport
  • Encourage use of public transport, cycling and walking
  • Optimize the environmental, social and economic costs for individual and society
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Financial provisioning of mobility systems
  • Integrating Intelligent transport systems
  • Energy economics and emissions management
  • The importance of equitable and practical pricing

Illustrative example for Management/Engineering: Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) describe technology applied to transport and infrastructure to transfer information between systems for improved safety, productivity and environmental performance. This includes stand-alone applications such as traffic management systems, information and warning systems installed in individual vehicles. Inspiration can be drawn from the implementation of ITS by the governments of Australia and New Zealand. Engineering as well as management applications can be used to develop such a system.

 

 

 

 

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Facilitate multi-modal transport
  • Encourage use of public transport, cycling and walking
  • Optimize the environmental, social and economic costs for individual and society
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Areas of exploration
  • Stakeholder engagement and advocacy
  • Land acquisition policies and enforcement
  • Environmental and other regulatory compliances
  • Implications of mobility as a commons (clean air, green spaces etc)

Illustrative example for Law/Policy: Land acquisition is a contentious and legally complex part of all urban mobility plans. Though it is necessary, it can often be misused in the name of public services and public good. There are key components like fair compensation, resettlement, social impact assessments, public hearings that ought to be part of a strong and equitable land acquisition policy. A good example of how complex this issue is can be seen by studying the current debate over land acquisition laws in India and their application in the urban mobility context.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key Objectives
  • ’Develop a mobility blueprint/solution for a study area in your proximity. The study area could be either a stretch of road, locality, residential or industrial belt, or even larger unit like a zone, town or city’’
  • Draw from the experiences and examples of big cities such as Delhi, Kolkata, Mumbai, Bangalore and Chennai while making your plan
  • Facilitate multi-modal transport
  • Encourage use of public transport, cycling and walking
  • Optimize the environmental, social and economic costs for individual and society
  • Analyze current and historical trends as well as & emerging needs and patterns
  • Current challenges and bottlenecks that hamper implementation and measures to address them
Part B 20% weightage (not mandatory)
Carbon Footprint

Ecological footprint, simply explained, is the measure of human demand on the earth’s ecosystem. All of us have an individual footprint that contributes to the global footprint.

Is there something individuals and institutions can do within their capacity to address this?

A good beginning will be to measure your own or institutions ecological footprint and make an incremental contribution to reducing the footprint.

Getting started with the campus footprint

B.1 Campus Footprint tool (10%)

* the campus footprinting tool can only be completed post registering and logging in

This part of the project is an exercise that aims to help you and your institution develop a greater understanding of its campus ecological footprint.

Benefits : The benefits of such a foot printing exercise are that it will increase the understanding of consumption patterns, identify potential areas for improvement and choices. The calculator focuses on footprint study of two key ecological elements, namely energy and water.

B.2 Analytical Summary (10%)

This part of the project includes preparing a 1 page summary basis the findings from the campus footprinting tool. An inventory of this nature is also an awareness raising tool. Making this connection can often lead to behavioral change. This data collection is not only to provide tangible numbers with which the institution can benchmark its sustainability parameters. It can also act as a much needed baseline against which future mitigation efforts in the campus can be measured.

Refer to the document on submission guidelines for more details.

Campus foot printing tool
10% Weightage
Analytical summary
10% Weightage

Colleges FAQ

Eligibility
  • The awards are open to any college in India.
  • For the college category, students in graduate programs (post completing the equivalent of 12th class/ Pre-university course In India) and above are eligible to participate.
  • Students pursuing Diploma and other vocational technical courses who have completed 1 year of education after 10th standard can also participate in the college category.
  • Maximum number of participants from each team is 5 students.
Note On Plagiarism
  • All entries submitted will undergo a plagiarism check.Plagiarism is copying, close imitation and publication of someone else’s material (written and/or electronic source like Wikipedia, internet articles etc.) and passing it off as one’s own.
  • Entries resorting to any form of plagiarism will be rejected and not be considered for assessment.
  • Please quote and reference an external source appropriately in your submission.
Submissions
  • Entries should be submitted in English.
  • Total size of the write up size for Part A- 2 Pages. Part B- 2500 words per theme.
  • Additional material may be requested from shortlisted teams and/or the institute they represent.
  • The format for attachment can be any one of the following: .doc, .docx, .pdf.
  • Only 1 attachment is allowed for each entry, and total file size limit is 25 MB per entry.
  • For supplementary material (Video, Presentation), you can either upload the content on Yousendit.com or YouTube and share us the link.
  • Last date for submission is 31st October 2016.
Evaluation criteria

The submissions to Wipro-earthian 2015 will be judged based on a broad approach as deemed appropriate by the jury. This will be based on the breadth and depth of understanding (comprehensiveness) of the scenario or selected topic, its context and interrelatedness the originality, relevance of the critique and/or suggested approaches (the submission need not be a solution; a critique of the present state or scenario is itself a complete submission).

To give some more clarity and a sense of direction to participants, we are listing a few key evaluation criteria. However, please don’t blindly go by these alone; keep a broader vision in mind, as mentioned above.

  • Rigor in understanding- this can come through analysis of publicly available information (secondary data), talking to experts and discussing in groups. For most of the complex sustainability issues, there is no defined solution set. It depends on the context! Your best guide is to approach with an open mind and critique or question anything that is thrown at you (incuding google search results and wikipedia.)
  • Innovation - Here innovation does not necessarily mean a complicated technological solution, but going outside the known thought patterns to understand the problems. It is also about taking steps solution/approach which considers perspectives of all stakeholder groups that your chosen topic touches.
  • Creativity in documentation. Use of different ways and methods of reporting that are weaved together to give a sense of the whole – like using diagrams, mind-maps click here
  • How does your submission help explore and get perspectives on the education and learning of your chosen subject matter? Is it limiting or sufficient?
Awards & Recognition

Awards are addressed at the institutional (school/college) level and not at the individual level. This is to encourage the building of institutional capability in the area of sustainability in education on a long term basis.

  • 10 awards of Rs.150000 each.
  • Half of the cash award (75,000) will be given to the students from the winning team and half (75,000) to the institution being represented.
  • Continuous engagement in the area of sustainability and education with students and winning institutes.
  • Trophy for the institution and certificates for the team members.
  • Appreciation Certificates for top-25 entries.

“Previous years’ winners are not eligible for the cash award for the two consecutive years following the year in which they were selected. For example if a school or college has received the cash award in 2011, they would not be eligible for the cash award in 2012 and 2013.”

Register for Wipro earthian 2016

Please register your organization for further details, regular updates, and participation.


For queries mail us at earthian.contact@wipro.com.
Download Editable/Printable Registration Form